Wikimedia Foundation

Congratulations to Prof. Matthew Vetter and IUP Graduate Student Oksana Moroz. The Wikimedia Foundation has approved a grant to help support the Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon at IUP.

Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

We’re writing to invite you and your students to participate in IUP’s fourth annual Interdisciplinary Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, to be held Tuesday, April 21, 2020, 10am-2pm (Stabley 201/210). At last year’s event, 91 editors made 228 edits to 73 articles in Wikipedia, adding over 12,000 words to help improve representation of women and the arts across disciplines. In addition to these accomplishments, student-participants were also given a chance to practice crucial digital literacy skills, collaboration, and critical thinking.This year’s event will emphasize topics related to language and literature as we work to build a more inclusive, diverse, and representative Wikipedia.

Wikipedia’s gender gap, which results in problems of representation attributed to the lack of women and non-male editors participating in the encyclopedia’s production, is by now well-known and well-documented. A groundbreaking survey conducted in 2011 by the Wikimedia Foundation, found that less than 10% of Wikipedia editors identify as women, and less than 1% as transgender. A startling statistic: only 17% of all biographical articles on Wikipedia focus on women. This event is a critical response to Wikipedia’s gender gap which invites the IUP community to help improve coverage of subjects related to women’s representation, art, language, literature and other under-represented topics.

Advance training workshops: We will be offering two hands-on workshops in advance of the main event, to be held Tuesday, March 31, 10am-12pm, and Wednesday, April 15, 2pm-4pm (Stabley 201). Both students and faculty are welcome at these events, which will support basic Wikipedia editing training, and article selection in anticipation of the Editathon. Contact mvetter@iup.edu to RSVP for these workshops.

Register in advance: Finally, We encourage advance registration of faculty and students (when possible) by visiting the following link: 

 

Questions? Concerns? Please follow up with us to chat more about this event. We look forward to hearing from you and hope you can find a way to participate in this event. Thank you,

Matt Vetter, on behalf of the Editathon Organizing Committee

2018 Twine Story Game Festival Hosted at IUP

On April 25, some seventy regional middle and high-school students will visit IUP in the culmination of a semester long activity.  Beginning early in the year, a team of IUP graduate students and faculty led on-site workshops to introduce students to the elements of hypertext, interactive fiction, and basic coding.

Visitors are welcome to enjoy and vote for viewer’s choice awards during the festival. The website of student works can be accessed during the festival and subsequently.

DHC Co-sponsors Second Annual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

wiki editors at table

Photo courtesy of Zeeshan Siddique

For the second year in a row, the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture (DHC) at IUP has co-sponsored an Edit-a-thon event focused on improving representation of women and the arts in Wikipedia. In a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. DHC affiliate Dr. Matt Vetter organized and led the event with Women’s and Gender Studies Director Dr. Lynn Botelho. The DHC also provided technical support and laptops for the event.

The Edit-a-thon took place March 7, 2018 in the Humanities and Social Sciences Building, Room 226. As part of this event, 66 editors made 429 edits to 29 articles in Wikipedia, adding nearly 6,000 words to help improve representation of women and the arts across disciplines.

This year’s Edit-a-thon also included a broader assessment initiative. Organizers conducted a survey to which 24 participants responded. Preliminary analysis of survey results demonstrates positive outcomes related to the event. In particular, 70% of those surveyed indicated that they would edit Wikipedia in the future. Additionally, 80% of the surveyed participants agreed that a Wikipedia classroom project is a worthwhile experience. Finally, as part of this survey, participants were asked to rank learning outcomes. Averages across these rankings showed that participants found the event useful for learning about outcomes in the following order: (1) critical thinking, (2) digital literacy, (3) technical skills, (4) online source reliability, (5) about the class topic, (6) writing for a general audience.

Doctoral students in Dr. Vetter’s English 846: Digital Rhetoric also conducted video interviews with 6 Edit-a-thon participants to learn more about their experience and learning related to digital literacy and critical thinking. This research is ongoing.

In addition to the sponsorship provided by the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture, this event was supported by the Wikimedia Foundation, IUP Libraries, Women’s & Gender Studies, Art, Theatre & Dance, and Composition & Applied Linguistics.

Creative Coding – Coffee Talk and Workshop

“Creative” or “Exploratory” coding involves teaching programming fundamentals to allow people outside of computer science to gain agency in the digital domain.

Through a Coffee Talk (Tues, 9am, Sutton 352) and a free, hands-on workshop (Weds, 9am, Sutton 352), Tomi Dufva invites members of the IUP community to become acquainted with the ways expression and the understanding of code can go together.

Tomi Dufva is co-founder of a school integrating coding an art for children.

DHC Affiliated Faculty Publish on Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

A decade after DHC folks begin experimenting with Wikis, newer faculty member and Asst. Professor Matt Vetter brought the pedagogy of Wiki Editing back to the fore at IUP.

Click here to read the article.

In an Art Feminism Edit-a-thon last year, Vetter worked with the DHC and Women’s Studies to host a DH intervention. Now, Theresa McDevitt of the library, along with Vetter, Weinstein and Sherwood (English/DHC) have published a jointly authored article.

Haunted Hypertext Created by IUP Students and DHC

(Students reading and writing the hypertext, on laptops and phones.)

As part of the Writing Carnival at IUP on October 20, 2017, the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture created a collaborative writing experience titled the Haunted Hypertext.

Visit the project: http://www.iupdhc.org/haunted/

Participants encountered an invitation to a story: “It began as a story set in a mid-Atlantic college town. As autumn leaves turn brown, visitors are invited to explore the paths that lead from one site to another. Perhaps you have heard rumors. Perhaps you hold the key to another piece of the story. Enter if you dare…”


When the festival began, readers could adventure throughsix different spaces. They could explore the abandoned mansion, graveyard, garden, warehouse, theater or schoolhouse, using a laptop or even their phone. But each one of these paths was incomplete or open-ended. So when they reached the stopping point of a branch, they were invited to invent the next passage to the story.

What is a hypertext?
Traditional print literature, from poems to stories, works with the linear constraints of the book. Hypertext names the branching, multi-linear web of possibilites that can be imagined when we shift to a spatial metaphor. Pages become passages, and each passage can lead to another. One passage can open to many, a path can lead you on an adventure, into a labyrinth, or toward an impossible dead end.

Over the source of two hours, 24 writers or pairs expanded the six basic scenes to a web text with 58 passages and 3819 words, the equivalent of 18 printed pages. The six initial passages branched into 19 paths.

Click for large image

The Haunted Hypertext was conceived by members of the IUP Center for Digital Humanities and Culture. The writing tool we are using is an “an open-source tool for telling interactive, nonlinear stories” called Twine. http://www.twinery.org

Unfortunately, Twine itself is designed for single authors and we wanted to create an opportunity for a large number of writers to come together, immerse themselves in the fictive space, and then add something to the shared text. Our solution was to embed a web survey in the hypertext, so that when readers were ready to write, they would be redirected to a submission form. Here they author a passage and submit it.

As this is happening, volunteers who are familiar with the use of Twine, take their contributions from the database, insert them into the appropriate space within the twine web, and then upload a new version to the website.


(IUP Graduate student Shane Sedlemyer, editing the Twine.)

Phase one of the project is published at:

http://www.iupdhc.org/haunted

Readers are now invited to “finish off” a number of branches which are incomplete. For several weeks after the festival, visitors are invited to bring “closure”; they can either redirect the story, so that it links back to (recursively) to an earlier passage or they can terminate the narrative. For example, perhaps “you” open the door to a closet, a bowling ball rolls out onto your head and you die; hopefully you can be more clever than that.

Visit one of the branches that need closure and use the “write” interface to complete the passage.

There will be one final update sometime after Halloween, where we’ll bring whatever degree of closure seems fitting.

Aljayyousi Awarded DAAD grant for DH Project

Dr. Mohammad Aljayyousi, an IUP alumnus who got his PhD in Literature and Criticism with a dissertation focusing on Digital Humanities under the supervision of Dr. Ken Sherwood, has recently been awarded a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) short term grant in Digital Humanities for his project on the digitization of novels and the creation of pedagogical tools for English majors through the digital medium. He has started his fellowship at the Cologne Center of eHumanities (CCeH) in Cologne, Germany this October (http://cceh.uni-koeln.de/).

Weinstein presents on Teaching, the “Wiki Way”

At the 2017 College Technology day, DHC Co-director Dan Weinstein presented “Strategies for Teaching with Co-Editable Digital Documents.”
In this session Dr. Weinstein will discussed and demonstrated strategies for constructing engaging, collaborative learning experiences in such co-editable digital spaces as Google Sites, Google Docs, and similar tools. Applications for collaborative documents in primary, secondary, and university settings were explored.