2018 Twine Story Game Festival Hosted at IUP

On April 25, some seventy regional middle and high-school students will visit IUP in the culmination of a semester long activity.  Beginning early in the year, a team of IUP graduate students and faculty led on-site workshops to introduce students to the elements of hypertext, interactive fiction, and basic coding.

Visitors are welcome to enjoy and vote for viewer’s choice awards during the festival. The website of student works can be accessed during the festival and subsequently.

Creative Coding – Coffee Talk and Workshop

“Creative” or “Exploratory” coding involves teaching programming fundamentals to allow people outside of computer science to gain agency in the digital domain.

Through a Coffee Talk (Tues, 9am, Sutton 352) and a free, hands-on workshop (Weds, 9am, Sutton 352), Tomi Dufva invites members of the IUP community to become acquainted with the ways expression and the understanding of code can go together.

Tomi Dufva is co-founder of a school integrating coding an art for children.

Keywords Chat – Glitch Aesthetics, Weds. 4/5 at Noon

Doctoral student Bradley Markle will lead this week’s discussion on “Glitch Aesthetics,”
which involves using errors and corruptions in digital transmission as a basis for making art.

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating “demos” and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

Keywords Chat – Flarf, Weds. 3/22

Click to Zoom.

Prof. Ken Sherwood will lead the next chat in the #Keywords series. “Flarf is an early twenty-first century neologism … to describe a poetic composition tactic specific to networked digital media, the sensibility that informs it, and, eventually a poetic movement…. Flarf composition typically involves the application of constraint based appropriate to digital media; in Flarf, this often involves burrowing into Google search results for inappropriate, awkward, obscene, or otherwise non-literary text.” (Flarf, Darrwn Wershler).

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating “demos” and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

Keywords Chat – Interactive Fiction, Weds 3/1

Graduate student Zainab Younus will lead the next chat in the #Keywords series. Interactive Fiction is considered a form of born-digital literature and forerunner to contemporary narrative video games. Ranging from text based adventures, to commercial products in the 1980s and 1990s, to contemporary fan fiction in the present — IF continues to fascinate reader/players and writer/programmers.

Zainab has generously shared her ** Interactive Fiction Slides ** . If you miss the Chat, you will find still find the slides and the links to classic IF works very useful!

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating “demos” and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

#Keywords – Chats on Digital Culture Series Launches for Spring 2017

The DHC launched the #Keywords (Chats in Digital Culture) with an exciting discussion on Machinima, led by graduate student Mark DiMauro. We had a wonderful discussion and shared some interesting examples.

The 14 attendees at our first session selected some topics for future discussions.

    Further Spring Events

  • 3/1 Interactive Fiction
  • 3/22 Flarf
  • 4/5 Glitch Aesthetics
  • 4/19 Quest Narrative

Keywords

 

The DHC is proud to announce #Keywords, an ongoing brown-bag lunch series this spring semester. #Keywords is an informal, educated discussion on key terms and language in use in the digital humanities today.Our hope is that through a brief introduction and informal conversation you can become better acquainted with this terminology, what it means, how it works, and why students find it important.No prior knowledge of any digital humanities topics are required to join in the conversation! We all hope to learn from one another and bring this knowledge into the classroom in the form of projects, handouts, and lesson plans.The first event will be hosted on Wed, Feb. 15 at noon in the Sutton third floor alcove. We’ll be discussing Machinima, presented by Mark DiMauro. Food will be provided, so join us and let’s talk about the future of the digital humanities!

Creative Coding – Coffee Talk and Workshop

Enlarge poster to print.

“Creative” or “Exploratory” coding involves teaching programming fundamentals to allow people outside of computer science to gain agency in the digital domain.

Through a Coffee Talk (Tues, 9am, Sutton 352) and a free, hands-on workshop (Weds, 9am, Sutton 352), Tomi Dufva invites members of the IUP community to become acquainted with the ways expression and the understanding of code can go together.

Tomi Dufva is co-founder of a school integrating coding an art for children. If you have interests in Video Game studies, Digital literature, Digital humanities or allied fields, please come to the Coffee Talk tomorrow morning or consider attending the hands-on workshop this Wednesday.